6/21/2008

CHANGE

Filed under: — Doug Contreras @ 10:52 am on

Without a doubt, Barrack Obama’s promise of change has caught the attention of the American public.

As a young plant manager, I was infatuated with change. I guess my thinking at that time was that new was always better than old. As experience matured me and as I got older, I began to see that my desire for newness did not always equate with better.

While I’ll leave the comments on Senator Obama’s battle cry to the political pundits, here’s a list of questions to ask when someone suggests change in the workplace:

  1. Exactly what needs to change and why?
  2. How much will it cost?
  3. Will the benefit outweigh the cost?
  4. What will we sacrifice or lose in order to effect the change?
  5. How long will the process take?
  6. Who will be responsible for implementing the change?
  7. Have benchmarks for progress been established?
  8. Can we do it in a way that minimizes confusion to our staff?

DOUG CONTRERAS
Visit my profile on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/dougcontreras
I welcome your invite to connect!
doug@performancedatamanagement.com

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6/10/2008

ACCOUNTABILITY

Filed under: — Doug Contreras @ 9:31 am on

If accountability has anything to do with efficiency and performance, why do managers avoid the issue? Here’s my bet as to the top three reasons:

  1. A dislike of confrontation;
  2. A fear of making a negative situation more negative;
  3. A desire to be politically correct by chalking off failures to obscure social issues.

In my experience, these are nothing more than excuses. Employees know better and have a little respect for a boss who buries his or her head in the sand.

If your approach to accountability is missing the mark, consider the following:

  • Clearly define the overall objective, the individual goals and the timing making sure they are doable;
  • Advertise the overall objective, the individual goals and the timing so each person is clear on what is expected;
  • Give your people the tools needed to do the job;
  • Measure progress against goals or benchmark at regular intervals;
  • Issue progress reports to each person involved in the process;
  • Acknowledge those who achieve positive results;
  • Counsel those who fall short.

DOUG CONTRERAS
Visit my profile on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/dougcontreras
I welcome your invite to connect!
doug@performancedatamanagement.com

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